Wednesday, 19 December 2012

Modern Witchcraft

Modern Witchcraft Details

In the years following the witchhunts of Early modern Europe and North America, little information of Witches trickled into the public space (from Witches nor those who claimed to know of Witches).[citation needed] However, this began changing during the early to mid 20th century. In the 1920s, the long standing Witch-cult hypothesis gained increasing attention in occult circles.[3] Though the hypothesis itself was largely falsifiable, it spurred renewed interest into Witchcraft - this time with new eyes and free of the panicked bias
Following the repeal of the U.K.'s Witchcraft Act of 1736, Witches were able to practice openly without fear of legal prosecution.
This paved the way for a revival of "the Craft." Occult author and founder of the tradition now known as Gardnerian Wicca,[3] English occultist Gerald Gardner was a figure at the forefront of this early revival and popularization.[3] He was instrumental in bringing the Contemporary Paganism to public attention. After Gardner's initiation in the New Forest coven, he began supplementing their ritual with borrowings from Freemasonry, Western ceremonial magic, the Golden Dawn, and the writings of Aleister Crowley. However, he claimed his tradition was a faithful continuation of Pre-Christian religion in Europe.[4] Gardnerian Wicca revolved around the veneration of both a Horned God and a Mother Goddess, the celebration of eight seasonally-based festivals in a Wheel of the Year, and the practice of magical rituals in groups known as covens. Gardnerian Wicca served as the ultimate ancestor, in terms of lineage, for all "British Traditional Wicca".

Gerald Gardner was not the only person claiming to be a member of a surviving remnant of old European Witchcraft. Others such as Sybil Leek, Charles Cardell, Raymond Howard, Rolla Nordic and, Robert Cochrane also claimed to have been initiated their ancestors and to be following "Hereditary" or "Traditional" forms of Witchcraft.[5] They alleged Gardner was propagating a modern, less true form of Witchcraft. For a time, there were attempts to reconcile and unite all the emerging traditions traditions of the 1950s.
Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
 Modern Witchcraft
                    

1 comment: